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Mark Finch Dip Mass, KMI

My Work
Biography

My Work

KMI (Kinesis Myofascial Integration) was developed by Thomas Myers from the pioneering work of Dr Ida P Rolf. KMI consists of a multi-session protocol (usually 12) of deep, slow, fascial and myofascial manipulation, coupled with movement re-education. The KMI method of structural integration concentrates on doing deep, lasting, and significant work. The KMI ‘recipe’ for structural integration is based around the Anatomy Trains Myofascial Meridians. Read more at: www.anatomytrains.net.

The goal of KMI is to unwind the strain patterns residing in your body’s myofascial system, restoring it to its natural balance, alignment, length, and ease. Common strain patterns come about from inefficient movement habits, and our body’s response to daily stresses. Individual strain patterns come from imitation of significant others when we were young, from the invasions of injury or surgery or birth, and from our body’s response to traumatic episodes. What starts as a simple gesture of response can become a neuro-muscular habit. These habitual movements form one’s posture, and the posture eventually changes the structure of the body’s connective tissue or ‘fabric’.

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Biography

Mark Finch has been a body worker since 1996. He has completed training in Therapeutic Massage, Neuromuscular therapy, Kinesis Myofascial Integration (KMI) and most recently Visceral Manipulation. He has successfully treated in a variety of therapeutic settings, from touring with the Riverdance troupe to maintaining a busy practice in Vancouver BC.

Mark teaches ‘The Anatomy Trains’ and ‘Fascia, Its Structure and Function’ in numerous international venues. He brings a deep foundation of clinical skill to his teaching, and this combined with his passion for learning and manual therapy make him a dynamic presenter.

When we are injured or stressed, no matter what the source of the stress, there is a neuro-muscular response – usually involving some combination of contraction, retraction, immobility, and often rotation. These patterns put some muscles under strain (so that they develop painful trigger points) and also pulls at the fascial fabric, requiring it to shift, thicken, glue itself to surrounding structures, and otherwise compensate for the excess sustained muscular holding. Especially when there are chronic and long-held patterns, it is not enough to simply release the muscular holding, even though that is definitely a good start. Freeing and repositioning the fascial fabric, along with re-integration of the movement patterns so that they stay easily in their proper positioning, is the aim of KMI.

Through a careful, progressive manipulation of the body’s ubiquitous organ of shape and structure, the myofascial web, a structural reorganization can then take place in our bodies.

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